Additional credit cardholders

If you regularly use a credit card, you might want more than one person to have access to the credit. It might be a spouse or could be an older child going off to travel on their own.

Joint account holders v additional cardholders

Unlike joint bank accounts, where debt is held jointly, in the UK there is no such thing as a joint credit card account.

Instead, credit card accounts must be held by one individual.

What you can do is add additional cardholders. The cardholder will have their own card and you’ll share the credit limit on your account.


The most important thing to note is although the credit limit is shared, the account holder is individually liable for all the debt and any fees incurred.

The account holder is the person who signs the credit card agreement with the credit provider.

Any additional cardholders will still be be responsible for using the card safely.


Giving someone close to you a card of their own may be convenient. It allows you to share credit without needing to be there every time they want to make a purchase.

Usually, a secondary cardholder is also entitled to collect any rewards available to the main account holder. This might mean any cashback or reward points you’re entitled to add up quicker.

Shared credit

The credit limit available is shared between all cardholders so you won’t get an equal split each.

It’s a good idea to talk to other cardholders and let them know about any unexpected or larger transactions.

If you go over the credit limit accidentally, you’ll likely be charged a fee. It can also negate any promotional offers or rewards where these are subject to staying within your credit limit.


Generally, secondary cardholders must be over 18. Providers may also limit the number of additional cardholders you can add.

Adding & removing cardholders

You will be able to add and remove cardholders through your online account or by calling customer support, depending on your bank or building society.

For more information on credit cards see our guide to credit cards explained.

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