Money Matters Team

5 ways to keep your pet calm this Christmas

By Money Matters Team 29/10/2015

Tis the season... to say 'So long, stress' and 'Hello happy pets'

Let's face it, Christmas can be a bit stressful for the best of us, so it’s no surprise that it can take its toll on your family pet too. So we chatted to RSPCA companion behaviour animal and welfare expert Alice Potter to find out how to help your dog or cat keep calm when the hoards descend at Christmas...

1. Pets like routines...

so stick to theirs as much as possible – make sure your dog or cat get their regular exercise, feed them at the usual time and don't block their toilet access with Auntie Ethel's suitcase!

2. Dog treats work wonders...

so if your pooch is wary of strangers, put a pot of their favourites by the front door and ask each visitor to give them one as they say hello. That way your dog will associate new people with rewards and be reassured (works especially well with Labradors!).

3. Create a safe haven for your pet...

so when it all becomes too much for them over the festive period, they can take themselves off to their place. This could be a crate (for a dog), their normal bed or a quiet spot in a bedroom for a cat – just make sure they have access to it at all times. This works better than shutting them away as it gives them the freedom to move around the house.

4. Give your cat somewhere to catnap...

because when felines feel anxious, they often want to hide or climb up high so they can see the whole room. Create some Christmas hidey-holes for them – an upturned cardboard box with a blanket, or a cushion on top of a wardrobe would work well.

5. Keep an eye on your pet...

especially if they're a bit of a homebody. With doors constantly opening and closing as visitors come and go, there'll be more opportunities for them to escape onto a busy road where they could get hurt, so you – and your guests – will need to stay on your guard.

This Money Matters post aims to be informative and engaging. Though it may include tips and information, it does not constitute advice and should not be used as a basis for any financial decisions. Sainsbury's Bank accepts no responsibility for the opinions and views of external contributors and the content of external websites included within this post. Some links may take you to another Sainsbury's Bank page. All information in this post was correct at date of publication.

We are using cookies on this website to enhance your browsing experience. You can read more information on our cookies by clicking the "Find out more about cookies" button. By continuing your journey on this site you consent to the continued use of cookies.